Select Page
Select Page

There are hundreds of questions you can ask during a job interview to help gauge whether to take a job. So many questions that it can be hard to keep track. Remember while an employer is figuring out whether you’re a good fit for the company, you should also be trying to figure out whether the company is a good fit for you. Here are nine questions you should ask to help you make the right decision..  

1) Can you describe a typical day or week in this position? 

This is how to make the responsibilities of this role detailed in the job description come to life. It’s a question that may also tell you about the level of intensity of the job and of the workplace and as well as what you’d be doing day to day.  

Career expert Alison Doyle told The Balance Careers this question is also helpful in finding out from the company your potential schedule as well as the personal qualities the company values in its employees.  

2) How is success measured in this role? 

This is a great way to get to hear how your manager will be evaluating your work and just how thoughtful they are?  What are their standards and measures of success? Does it sound clearly articulated or is it squishy and vague?  If it’s the latter, this may be a tough work environment to demonstrate your impact.

3) Is this a new position and if not, why did the person before me leave? 

This is a question to help you dig up any potential problems or hurdles you could be facing in this job.  Is this a company that promotes its employees into new roles and will there be opportunities for you to grow and stretch new muscles?  Or is this a company that chews up its people and spits them out?  

Angela Copeland, founder and coach at Copeland Coaching, told Business Insider that it’s useful to figure out if that last person quit or was promoted?  And this blunt interview question gets right to the heart of the matter..  

4) Could you describe the culture at this company? 

This question helps to uncover company values and it can act as an umbrella for more specific questions you may have: Is there work-life balance? Is there any collaboration involved in this position? Can you bring your authentic self into the workplace? Do co-workers spend time with each other outside of work?  

Ideally, employers should cultivate a positive and supportive work environment because that’s also how they retain their employees and productivity. . In a 2017 study from the University of Warwick in the UK, researchers found that unhappy employees are 10 percent less productive while happy employees are 12 percent more productive than the average employee.  

5) What do you like about working here? 

Make sure to do your homework on the person or persons interviewing you and see how long they’ve worked at this company. If they’ve been there longer than a year this is a really good question to ask.  

Amy Hoover, former SVP of employment agency Talent Zoo, told Seattle Corporate Search that this question can also help to create a bond between you and the interviewer. People like to talk about themselves and this question can give you an inside scoop of benefits the organization has to offer that might not be listed in the job description. 

6) What’s one of the most interesting projects or opportunities that I might expect to work on in this role either solo or with other team members?  

Your new manager may give you projects that pique your interest and offer growth opportunities to look forward to if you land the position. 

When Business Insider asked Shark Tank alum and Core Satellite Partners advisor Becca Brown why she liked this question,she said it gives the interviewee an idea of how colleagues work together and in their individual roles.  

​            7) How do you ensure your workplace is diverse and inclusive?

This question potential to show you how you’d be valued as an employee AND as a human being. The diversity of a company’s leadership is a great indicator of its ability to ensure diversity and inclusion throughout the organization itself. 

Survey Monkey research science manager Laura Wronski says employees working at companies that value diversity, equity, and inclusion are more satisfied with their jobs and are more likely to have career advancing opportunities.  

8) What do you think inspires employees stay at your company? 

What you’re really asking here is: Will there be great benefits and enriching opportunities for me for professional development and growth? This is a question to help you get another clue whether or not this is a company that works to keep its employees happy, motivated and challenged. 

Since the pandemic struck in early 2020, hundreds of thousands of employees have quit their jobs because they feel underserved and unhappy with their employers, according to the Pew Research Center.  In May 2021, 3.6 million Americans resigned, “a record-high number of unfilled positions,” according to Gallup. It’s smart to try to figure out the answer to this question sooner rather than later.  

9) What’s your timeline for next steps with respect to filling this position? 

The worst feeling is being ghosted — or left hanging for weeks on end by a company you were sure you’d left a good impression on during your interview. While you may not be able to prevent this from happening, this question shows interviewers that communication is key for you and you’re eager to hear back from this company because you’re really interested in the job. .  

“Never leave an interview without finding out the company’s timeline for making a decision and determining when and how you should follow up afterwards about your candidacy,” said TopResume career advice expert Amanda Augustine in an interview with Business Insider. 

Interviewing for a job is a two-way street.  And while it may seem like those interviewing you are the ones with all the power, hopefully these questions will give you a head-start on what you might want and need to know if you get an offer. Good luck

© Time4Coffee, LLC 2022 | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Designed by HogTheWeb

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This