Inspiration

I genuinely do not think I have ever followed through with any new year's resolutions.  Have you?  Chances are you’re not one of the 8% of people who accomplish them. Studies have shown that less than 25% of people actually stay committed to their resolutions after just 30 days. I know this is an uninviting statistic but here's the punchline, in 2020, we’re not setting resolutions, we’re setting goals. 
Grit is what happens when hard work and dedication hook up and have a baby. It personifies a steely determination to get something done despite obstacles standing in your way. So many of the guests on T4C have had to cultivate grit, perhaps more than any other quality, to achieve their professional goals. But, if you’re anything like me -- a sophomore in college who is trying to figure things out -- that may seem intimidating, confusing and overwhelming to consider. Feeling like you don’t know where to start? Look no further; here are five proven ways to cultivate grit in your life.
Failure, to most, seems like one of the harshest seven letter words out there. Falling far short of your goals can be a terrible feeling. But when you go off the cliff, or face plant, it is crucial to look at those moments as opportunities to grow. Not accomplishing a certain goal, can provide many insights, which can later help fuel future professional achievements! Don’t believe me? Well, take it from some of our super successful Time4Coffee podcast guests. Below are the top 5 hacks as to why failing can actually be a good thing.
Every one of my family members knew where I was going to attend college: New York. There was no question about it even when my school of choice only offered me half of the tuition; even when their scholarship program rejected me; even after receiving no response to my letter that practically begged for more financial aid. So when the financial office at my NYC dream school told me that no amount of loans could help me to afford the school, I remember calling my brother on the phone in tears, crying so hard that I could barely stand from the pain in my abdomen.
Zac Willette is a board certified chaplain and founder and president of Allay Care, a nonprofit organization that guides people through both life and death experiences by helping them become more comfortable talking about and documenting end of life wishes and values. It is his belief that we are never too young or too healthy to get prepared for death, that death is part of life, and that death should be considered with dignity and beauty, similar to the way we view life.
Zac Willette is a board certified chaplain and founder and president of Allay Care, a nonprofit organization that guides people through both life and death experiences by helping them become more comfortable talking about and documenting end of life wishes and values. It is his belief that we are never too young or too healthy to get prepared for death, that death is part of life, and that death should be considered with dignity and beauty, similar to the way we view life.

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